Six Wives: The Queens of Henry VIII by David Starkey

Six Wives by David StarkeyFirst, an apology because I’ve seriously been slacking with the reviews. Sorry folks! But I should have a number of good posts up in the next few weeks.

Now, I picked up David Starkey’s Six Wives: The Queens of Henry VIII because I had just read Elizabeth Freemantle’s Queen’s Gambit, and it always frustrates me when I read historical fiction about real important figures because I can’t separate the history from the fiction. I was debating between Starkey and Alison Weir’s The Six Wives of Henry VIII, both of which had equally good reviews on Goodreads, but ultimately made my decision based on availability at the library.

And Starkey, noted British historian and Tudor expert, was a good choice though obviously I can’t compare the two (but I did not appreciate his open disdain for Weir’s work in the foreword). He divided his book up into sections, with the larger first half concentrating on Henry’s first wife, Queen Catherine of Aragon, and a slightly smaller chunk thereafter on Anne Boleyn. Unfortunately, that left the remaining book to four queens, who got short-shrifted a bit, but I guess that’s inevitable given the strong political-cultural impact of the cold war between Catherine’s and Anne’s factions. Additionally, all six queens had to share room with countless other, predominantly male courtiers, which I thought detracted from the supposed focus.

I’m not going to lie, these parts of it were quite dry and Starkey’s consistent shifting between usage of titles and given names made the narrative at times confusing. However, I think he was particularly good at delving into the international political intrigue of the period and extremely thorough in his examination of various individual’s motives for their actions. While this made the reader quite sympathetic to the queens, Henry’s longing for a son didn’t excuse his foul treatment of women in my eyes nor did Starkey’s free pass make me like the author any more than the subject.

At a hefty 800 pages, it’s not a light read nor a great one. Nevertheless, for fans of the Tudor period, including fictional works like the series The Tudors, Starkey’s biography provides rich context to fill in any gaps in knowledge.

3 Stars

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